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Chanel Skis...Really?

Chanel Skis...Really?

[ Wed, 2010-03-24 13:19 ]
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Chanel Skis
When a fashion brand comes out with a ski, we're always interested to check it out. But these pricey Chanel skis, made from rosewood, fiberglass, and aluminum, might just be a little over the top. Here's what we'd tell Chanel if they asked for our opinion.

When a fashion brand comes out with a ski, we're always interested to check it out. But these pricey Chanel skis, made from rosewood, fiberglass, and aluminum, might just be a little over the top. Here's what we'd tell Chanel if they asked for our opinion.

Dear Chanel,

We appreciate you making an effort to get into the ski industry with your new Chanel skis. There's still plenty of room for innovation. And we like that you claim that your "parabolic skis are fit for any level of skier, including advanced skiers." But you should know the term "parabolic" is a little outdated now. All skis now have a shape to them—nobody skis on French Fry-straight skis anymore. And there's this technology in ski shape now called rocker, which you should really check out—it's getting quite big. And although wood topsheets are making a comeback (check out Line's Prophet 100 for a good example), did you really need to go with rosewood, a high-end wood used mainly for cabinetry?

And about that price...$3,600 for skis? Really. Do you realize you could buy an entire quiver of skis from another brand for that price? Or you could go on a ski vacation with your entire family for that amount?

Backcountry.com blogger Rocky Thompson perhaps put it best when he said, "I just can’t find any place in my heart for these Chanel Skis. I suppose I could get behind them if Chanel was making a backcountry rig, something with a nice gold-trimmed carbon topsheet and a Dynafit setup. But these overpriced resort boards that likely won’t even leave the spa at Stein Erickson Lodge? I can’t wait to be standing in the liftline and see someone on these things ski over the tips of my skis."

So, do us a favor, and the next time you decide to design a ski, come ask us what we think. We'll help, we promise. Until then, maybe you should stick to the hand bags and dresses.

Sincerely,

Ski Magazine