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75th Anniversary Issue

Skier of the Decade: Minnie Dole, 1940s

Skier of the Decade: Minnie Dole, 1940s
minnie dole 40s
The man credited with inventing ski patrol.

When America entered World War II, 4,000 ski patrolmen were dispensing first aid and helping injured skiers off the mountain. The all-volunteer patrol had been the idea of New York insurance broker C. Minot “Minnie” Dole, who witnessed a friend hit a tree and die because no one with medical skill or a proper sled was there to rescue him. Working with the Red Cross and the National Ski Association in the late 1930s, he recruited and trained ski patrols across the nation.

Skier of the Decade: Dick Durrance, 1930s

Skier of the Decade: Dick Durrance, 1930s
dick durrance 30s
Why American Dick Durrance was an exception to the superiority of European skiers.

An exception to the superiority of European skiers in the 1930s was American Dick Durrance. As a boy, he lived and learned to ski in Garmisch- Partenkirchen, Germany. In the shadow of the Zugspitze, he won the 1932 German National Junior Championship. Before returning to America in 1933, the precocious Durrance copied a feet-together racing turn from twotime world slalom champion Toni Seelos of Austria. Durrance brought the new turn back to America as a harbinger of future technique.

The Future of the Environment

We asked Auden Schendler what he thinks about the future of the environment.

Auden Schendler is one of skiing’s greatest nags. As green guru for Aspen Ski Resorts, one of the most environmentally progressive ski areas in the world, Schendler is a loud voice urging skiers and the industry to take action against climate change. Several years back, Aspen even ran ads calling winter an endangered species. We asked Schendler about his vision—and hopes—for skiing in 2086.

The Future of Resorts

As CEO of Vail Resorts, which owns Vail, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Heavenly, Northstar and other properties and ventures, Rob Katz oversees one of the largest and most sophisticated ski-resort operations in the world. He seemed like an appropriate expert on the subject.

As CEO of Vail Resorts, which owns Vail, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Heavenly, Northstar and other properties and ventures, Rob Katz oversees one of the largest and most sophisticated ski-resort operations in the world. Katz is a strong believer in the power of emerging technologies to connect skiers to each other and to their favorite mountains.

The Future of Hardgoods

Tim Petrick, president of Rossignol North America, shares insight on the innovation of hardgoods.

Tim Petrick, president of Rossignol North America, has worked with a variety of brands, consistently pushing innovation. He sees a future when skis and boots are as radically different from today’s stuff as today’s stuff is from what we used 75 years ago. Advanced materials and designs will fulfill the quest for a one-ski-quiver that improves performance to a point where bunny slopes are no longer needed.

The Future of Apparel

Columbia’s innovation expert, Woody Blackford, discusses smart technology in apparel.

Columbia’s innovation expert, Woody Blackford is the prime mover of one of the most promising technologies in ski apparel: electronically heated garments. Blackford envisions a future when smart technology will be embedded in skiwear to maximize heating and cooling—and help you communicate on the go.

SKI › What will skiers wear in 75 years? The Future of Apparel

The Future of Competition

We asked Troy Flanagan, high-performance director for the U.S. Ski Team, what he thinks is the next big thing as far as athletes are concerned.

Troy Flanagan, high-performance director for the U.S. Ski Team, holds a Ph.D. in aerospace engineering. That’s right, a rocket scientist. Flanagan’s job is to brainstorm new methods and training techniques to make U.S. athletes stronger and faster. Flanagan sees great potential in two emerging fields of research—microtechnology and nanotechnology—to maximize the athletic feats of future Olympians and World Cup competitors.

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