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Stormrider 107

Stockli

2017

rating2.67

price$1199

Ratings
Stability At Speed: 
3.74 / 5
Hard Snow Performance: 
3.33 / 5
Crud Performance: 
2.74 / 5
Forgiveness: 
2.05 / 5
Overall: 
2.67 / 5
Flotation: 
3.29 / 5

YEAR2016/2017

WAIST WIDTH107mm

TIP/TAIL/WAIST135-107-127

LEVEL

LENGTHS174, 183, 192

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With its 107 mm waist, the Stormrider 107 still has plenty of flotation in deep snow, but compared to the full-fat Stormrider 115, it's quicker to edge and generally more amenable to hardpack conditions, making it a likely everyday ski for experts in Western locales. Like the Stormrider 95, it features Stockli's TRI technology: carbon inserts are placed at the tip and tail of the ski to stiffen them both torsionally and longitudinally while reducing swing weight. Stockli's Stormrider series, built for adventuresome freeriding, has expanded to eight models. The series includes the Swiss brand's top sellers in the U.S. market. Waist widths have grown over the past few years, now ranging from a powder-specific 115 mm down to a touring-appropriate 83 mm. The series now includes two women's models at 85 and 100 mm. Rocker profiles vary, from subtle to pronounced, depending on model. All are classic Stockli constructions: wood cores for responsiveness and integrity, metal reinforcement for durability and high-speed calm, vertical sidewalls for optimized edge grip and solidity. One notable difference between Stormrider constructions and other Stocklis is that the upper layer of metal serves as the topsheet of the ski, rather than being covered by another laminate. This makes the topsheets uncommonly durable and gives the Stormriders a rich look. Core compositions vary from model to model. Stockli's Light Core combines two different woods-sturdy, resilient ash and lightweight ceiba (a West African species). Stockli's Super Light Cores incorporate balsa wood along with the other two for additional weight savings. Stockli Skis, founded in 1935 and under its third generation of family ownership, is based in Wohusen, Switzerland, near Lucerne. -J.C.

Delight Prime

Elan

2017

rating2.65

price$800

Ratings
Stability At Speed: 
2.86 / 5
Hard Snow Performance: 
2.99 / 5
Crud Performance: 
1.99 / 5
Forgiveness: 
2.76 / 5
Overall: 
2.65 / 5
Flotation: 
1.63 / 5

YEAR2016/2017

WAIST WIDTH78mm

TIP/TAIL/WAIST125-78-103

LEVEL

LENGTHS146, 152, 158, 164

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A shade narrower than the top-of-the-line model, the 2017 Elan Delight Prime is also a bit more forgiving. It gets a full wood core, but one made of only the lightest woods, and there's no carbon-tube reinforcement as in the stiffer Delight Supreme. The Prime's sidewalls are a shade less edgy (with partial rather than full sidewalls). And it comes with a slightly lighter and less-expensive 10-DIN binding. Elan's Supreme series includes three skis with waist widths of 76 to 78 mm, all built to be as light as possible without great sacrifice of performance. Constructions vary from model to model, but all have deep-dish sidecuts (roughly 10 to 14 meters, depending on size) that hook up readily into tight slalom-style arcs. All are sold only as systems, with bindings mounted on Elan's Shift System binding interface-a thin, free-flexing, lightweight plate-on-plate system dampened by rubber. Elan is based in Behunje na Gorenjskem, Slovenia, where it was founded during World War II to make skis for Yugoslav partisans. Partner brands include Alpina boots. Long state-run, it was privatized in 2015, when a Russian venture capital fund acquired a 95 percent stake. -J.C.

Spirit Motion

Stockli

2017

rating2.55

price$799

Ratings
Stability At Speed: 
2.77 / 5
Hard Snow Performance: 
3.26 / 5
Crud Performance: 
1.76 / 5
Forgiveness: 
2.33 / 5
Overall: 
2.55 / 5
Flotation: 
1.30 / 5

YEAR2016/2017

WAIST WIDTH79mm

TIP/TAIL/WAIST122-79-108

LEVEL

LENGTHS155, 163, 171, 179

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The Motion is the women's model in the Spirit collection of "all-round" skis. With a wider waist width than the men's Globe (79 mm), it offers a stable platform that's easy to balance on and never overly edgy. But it's still built to carve readily on hardpack, with a moderate sidecut radius favors medium-radius turns. It is fully cambered for maximum effective edge length and rebound, with no tip rocker. The Spirit series features two narrow-waisted frontside carvers suitable for intermediate to advanced skiers who stick to the groomers. They're built for comfort and ease. Compared to the Laser series of expert-level carvers, they feature softer flexes and softer, less edgy sidewalls. Both are metal-free constructions, for light weight and ease of use. All are built on full wood cores. Stockli Skis, now 75 years old and under its third generation of family ownership, is based in Wohusen, Switzerland, near Lucerne. -J.C.

Supernatural 86

Line

2017

rating2.51

price$700

Ratings
Stability At Speed: 
2.23 / 5
Hard Snow Performance: 
1.98 / 5
Crud Performance: 
2.02 / 5
Forgiveness: 
3.32 / 5
Overall: 
2.51 / 5
Flotation: 
2.35 / 5

YEAR2016/2017

WAIST WIDTH86mm

TIP/TAIL/WAIST125-86-112

LEVEL

LENGTHS165, 172, 179

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With its 86-mm waist width, the Line Supernatural 86, new for 2017, becomes the narrowest and least-expensive model in the Supernatural collection of directional freeriders. With an MSRP of $700, it'll sell for a "street price" of about $550 in many shops. It's targeted at Eastern freeriders who have to be realistic about the quality of snow they expect to encounter. Of all the Supernaturals, it's the quickest edge-to-edge, and with strong full-height/full-length sidewalls and a medium-arc sidecut, it's designed to be a capable carver on all but the hardest Eastern ice. In Line's men's collection, 11 of the 18 skis have waist widths of 100 mm or more. The Supernatural collection splits the difference, with two models above 100 (Supernatural 115 and 108), two below (92 and the new 86), and one sitting right at 100. More important, the Supernaturals are the edgiest, heaviest, and most powerful layups in the Line collection, making them likely choices for strong, technical skiers who like to stand on an edge and bend the ski. Like the Sick Days, they're built for traditional, directional performance, with aft-of-center sidecut waisting and mounting points. (For skis with more center-mounted, bi-directional freestyle performance, see the Freestyle collection twin-tips-Mordecai, Bacon, Wallisch, etc.) All are built on Line's sturdiest wood core. Constructions vary: a combination of cap and sidewall in the fattest (115), full sidewalls with rubber dampening in the 108 and 100, regular full sidewalls in the two narrowest (92 and 86). The Supernatural 115 and 108 are described by Line as stiff-flexing; the rest, medium. All have a little more heft than their counterparts in the less-edgy Sick Day series, as well as slightly longer sidecut radii (about 18 to 21 meters), for longer arcs and hook-free charging at speed, and lower rocker in the tail, for stronger turn finishes and sturdier rearward support. Line Skis, founded in 1995 by early independent ski-making entrepreneur and twin-tip inventor Jason Levinthal, is a subsidiary of K2, which, along with Volkl, Dalbello, and Marker, is a subsidiary of the Jarden Group, which was itself purchased by the Newell Rubbermaid consumer-products conglomerate in 2016. Based in Seattle, Wash., Line manufactures its skis in China. Sister brands include K2 and Full Tilt. -J.C.

Interra

Elan

2017

rating2.52

price$650

Ratings
Stability At Speed: 
2.71 / 5
Hard Snow Performance: 
2.64 / 5
Crud Performance: 
2.34 / 5
Forgiveness: 
2.70 / 5
Overall: 
2.52 / 5
Flotation: 
2.08 / 5

YEAR2016/2017

WAIST WIDTH83mm

TIP/TAIL/WAIST130-83-112

LEVEL

LENGTHS152, 158, 164

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The 2017 Elan Interra is the widest ski in the Power group of women's technical carvers. With a waist width of 82 to 84 mm (depending on size), it has some soft-snow buoyancy that the others lack, for occasional powder (or super-soft groomers, where it won't trench too deeply at speed). It's the only Power group ski available flat as well as with binding. The Interra is part of the Power group in Elan's women's all-mountain collection-four models (Speed Magic, Insomnia, Inspire, and Interra) with narrow waists (67-84 mm), designed for high-performance groomed-snow carving. New this year, all but the super-narrow Speed Magic feature Elan's unique Amphibio 4D technology. Amphibio skis are right/left dedicated, with different rocker/camber profiles in the forebody. The inside edges are cambered all the way to the tip, so the working ski has the benefits of camber: tip-to-tail edge grip, and rebound energy out of the turn. The outside edges are rockered, so the uphill edge is looser in the snow, easier to pivot and steer, better able to absorb terrain shocks. The newer 4D version also features Dual Shaped Ti, the performance-specific shaping of the profile of the ski fore and aft. In front, the top of the ski is convex, and the strength of its arch shape delivers strong pressure to the edge for precise turn entries. At the tail, the top of the ski is concave, delivering less edge pressure for mellow turn exits. All four Power models have full-height, vertical sidewalls (the strongest kind). All have metal reinforcement (for edge-power and high-speed calm). All have deep, slalomesque sidecuts that favor an energetic, quick-turn attack. Cores vary from all wood (for responsiveness and durability) to foam with wood stringers (for some of the benefits of wood with lighter weight and softer flex). All are sold with bindings on Elan's Shift System binding interface-a thin, free-flexing, lightweight plate-on-plate system dampened by rubber. Elan is based in Behunje na Gorenjskem, Slovenia, where it was founded during World War II to make skis for Yugoslav partisans. Partner brands include Alpina boots. Long state-run, it was privatized in 2015, when a Russian venture capital fund acquired a 95 percent stake. -J.C.

Pandora 110

Line

2017

rating2.49

price$800

Ratings
Stability At Speed: 
2.40 / 5
Hard Snow Performance: 
1.60 / 5
Crud Performance: 
2.19 / 5
Forgiveness: 
2.63 / 5
Overall: 
2.49 / 5
Flotation: 
3.16 / 5

YEAR2016/2017

WAIST WIDTH110mm

TIP/TAIL/WAIST142-110-125

LEVEL

LENGTHS152, 162, 172, 179

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The 2017 Line Pandora 110, which returns unchanged, except for a new graphic, is the widest women's ski Line makes. It's width (110 mm at the waist) and pronounced rocker make it a buoyant, surfy powder specialist. Line gives it a lightweight core and medium-edgy Capwall construction (cap on top, riding on low full-length sidewalls) for slashy, smeary performance in deep snow. Line offers 18 models for men, but for women it keeps things simpler, with just four models. Women's waist widths range from 115 down to 86. For soft-snow freeriding, the Pandora models, the 110 and the 95, are generously wide and amply rockered for powder and crud flotation in typical Western conditions. To keep things light, both Pandoras are built with Line's Maple Lite core: dense maple underfoot for sturdy edge grip, airier aspen fore and aft, for reduced swing weight. The narrower models, Soulmate 92 and Soulmate 85, are quicker and edgier, better suited to Eastern snow conditions. They get Line's denser Maple Macroblock cores: full-length maple stringers sandwiched by lighter aspen-for extra edge power, durability, and responsiveness. Constructions vary, from economical cap at the low end (Soulmate 86) to full-length/full-height sidewalls, for hard-snow grip, on the midfat models (Soulmate 92 and Pandora 95), to a mix of the two-soft-flexing cap riding on low, medium-edgy sidewalls-in the top-end Pandora 110. All have slight-twin tails, for smeary turn finishes, quick direction changes, and easy speed control. Line Skis, founded in 1995 by early independent ski-making entrepreneur and twin-tip inventor Jason Levinthal, is a subsidiary of K2, which, along with Volkl, Dalbello, and Marker, is a subsidiary of the Jarden Group, which was itself purchased by the Newell Rubbermaid consumer-products conglomerate in 2016. Based in Seattle, Wash., Line manufactures its skis in China. Sister brands include K2 and Full Tilt. -J.C.

Luv Machine 74Ti

K2

2017

rating2.49

price$1100

Ratings
Stability At Speed: 
2.73 / 5
Hard Snow Performance: 
2.28 / 5
Crud Performance: 
1.76 / 5
Forgiveness: 
2.80 / 5
Overall: 
2.49 / 5
Flotation: 
1.64 / 5

YEAR2016/2017

WAIST WIDTH74mm

TIP/TAIL/WAIST121-74-107

LEVEL

LENGTHS146, 153, 160, 167

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The quick, edgy, narrow-waisted Luv Machine 74Ti returns unchanged for 2017. It's built for precision, power and high performance on groomed snow. K2 aims it at expert women who know how to carve a turn, or athletic women who want to learn. The Luv Machine's short, slalom-style sidecut radius favors tight, quick turns. Its construction is designed to perform well at high speeds. The Luv Machine is available flat, but also sold as a system with an integrated 11-DIN K2-branded Marker ERC binding. The Luv Machine's core is a mix of fir, paulownia, and bamboo with channels milled out to reduce weight. Metal reinforcement dampens vibrations at high speeds, improves torsional rigidity (or twist resistance, for edge power), and enhances durability. HybriTech Sidewall construction combines a sturdy vertical sidewall underfoot for edge grip with rounded-over cap construction fore and aft for supple flex. K2's Speed Rocker combines 90 percent camber with 10 percent tip rocker to smooth the ride and enhance forgiveness and improve soft-snow flotation. K2 was founded in 1962 by the Kirschner brothers, who pioneered the use of fiberglass in ski construction at their Vashon Island, Wash., factory. The brand is now based in Seattle and builds its skis in China. It is owned by Newell Brands, a consumer products conglomerate. -J.C.

Supernatural 92

Line

2017

rating2.44

price$750

Ratings
Stability At Speed: 
1.83 / 5
Hard Snow Performance: 
1.48 / 5
Crud Performance: 
2.35 / 5
Forgiveness: 
2.93 / 5
Overall: 
2.44 / 5
Flotation: 
2.85 / 5

YEAR2016/2017

WAIST WIDTH92mm

TIP/TAIL/WAIST131-92-118

LEVEL

LENGTHS165, 172, 179, 186

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The Line Supernatural 92, which returns updated for 2017, is the second-narrowest model in the Supernatural collection of directional freeriders. With its 92-mm waist, it's equipped to get around on typical Eastern hardpack, but still has enough width and soft-snow buoyancy for spring slop and occasional powder days. New this year, its tip has been reshaped for mellower turn entries. In Line's men's collection, 11 of the 18 skis have waist widths of 100 mm or more. The Supernatural collection splits the difference, with two models above 100 (Supernatural 115 and 108), two below (92 and the new 86), and one sitting right at 100. More important, the Supernaturals are the edgiest, heaviest, and most powerful layups in the Line collection, making them likely choices for strong, technical skiers who like to stand on an edge and bend the ski. Like the Sick Days, they're built for traditional, directional performance, with aft-of-center sidecut waisting and mounting points. (For skis with more center-mounted, bi-directional freestyle performance, see the Freestyle collection twin-tips-Mordecai, Bacon, Wallisch, etc.) All are built on Line's sturdiest wood core. Constructions vary: a combination of cap and sidewall in the fattest (115), full sidewalls with rubber dampening in the 108 and 100, regular full sidewalls in the two narrowest (92 and 86). The Supernatural 115 and 108 are described by Line as stiff-flexing; the rest, medium. All have a little more heft than their counterparts in the less-edgy Sick Day series, as well as slightly longer sidecut radii (about 18 to 21 meters), for longer arcs and hook-free charging at speed, and lower rocker in the tail, for stronger turn finishes and sturdier rearward support. Line Skis, founded in 1995 by early independent ski-making entrepreneur and twin-tip inventor Jason Levinthal, is a subsidiary of K2, which, along with Volkl, Dalbello, and Marker, is a subsidiary of the Jarden Group, which was itself purchased by the Newell Rubbermaid consumer-products conglomerate in 2016. Based in Seattle, Wash., Line manufactures its skis in China. Sister brands include K2 and Full Tilt. -J.C.

Powertrack 89

Dynastar

2017

rating2.39

price$750

Ratings
Stability At Speed: 
2.23 / 5
Hard Snow Performance: 
2.10 / 5
Crud Performance: 
2.38 / 5
Forgiveness: 
2.61 / 5
Overall: 
2.39 / 5
Flotation: 
2.29 / 5

YEAR2016/2017

WAIST WIDTH89mm

TIP/TAIL/WAIST126-89-110

LEVEL

LENGTHS165, 172, 179, 186

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The 2017 Dynastar Powertrack 89 is the flagship model in the Powertrack line of all-mountain mid-fats. With its 89-mm waist, it offers the greatest soft-snow versatility. And it's built for calm, stable, expert-level performance at high speeds, with two sheets of reinforcing metal. It's sold either flat (no binding) or as a system, with a 12-DIN Look SPX Dual binding, which accepts either a normal alpine boot sole or the new rockered WTR-style style boot sole. Dynastar's All Mountain collection of versatile mid-fat generalists includes four Powertracks with waist widths 89, 84 and 79 mm and target ability levels ranging from expert down to intermediate. The Powertracks, which return unchanged for 2017, blend some of the hard-snow carvability of Dynastar's Speed Zone series with some of the smeary looseness and soft-snow buoyancy of the freeriding Cham series. There's classic camber underfoot, for arcing on groomed snow. And there's rocker tip and tail for shock absorption and flotation in powder and crud. Meanwhile, Dynastar's Five-Point Sidecut gives the Powertracks a dose of newschool, freeridey slashiness: The tip and tail are tapered (ie, the widest points are closer to the foot), making them looser in the snow, easier to pivot and foot-steer. All Powertracks are built on durable, responsive poplar wood cores. The top two models (89 and 84) are laminate constructions with full-length, full-height, vertical sidewalls, for maximum edge power and torsional rigidity (twist resistance). The two 79-mm models (79 CA Fluid and 79 CA Xpress) have vertical sidewalls underfoot that taper down into softer-flexing, more forgiving cap construction fore and aft, for intermediate-friendly mellowness at slower speeds. The top two models are sold either flat or with binding; the lower two are sold only as ski-and-binding system. Dynastar, along with sister brands Look, Lange, and Kerma (poles), is part of the privately owned Rossignol Group. It's factory headquarters are in Sallanches, France, "in the shadow of Mont Blanc." It was founded in 1963. -J.C.

Vantage X 75 CTI

Atomic

2017

rating2.44

price$725

Ratings
Stability At Speed: 
2.25 / 5
Hard Snow Performance: 
2.87 / 5
Crud Performance: 
1.48 / 5
Forgiveness: 
2.77 / 5
Overall: 
2.44 / 5
Flotation: 
1.65 / 5

YEAR2016/2017

WAIST WIDTH75mm

TIP/TAIL/WAIST122-75-105

LEVEL

LENGTHS156, 163, 170, 177

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The Vantage X 75 CTi is built on the narrowest waist width (75 mm) in the new Vantage X line, which makes it the quickest, edgiest, and most hard-snow-appropriate member of the new group of piste-centric all-mountain skis. Like the two top models in the series, it's metal-reinforced for high-speed performance. (Atomic offers a lighter, metal-free version as well, the Vantage X 75 C.) Rather than the top-of-the-line 13-DIN Warden MNC binding that comes with the top two models, the Vantage X 75 CTi comes with a still-sturdy but less-expensive 12-DIN Atomic XT binding. It sells for about $200 less than the next model up. It's part of Atomic's new Vantage X collection of narrow-waisted frontside all-mountain skis. The five-model men's Vantage X series, with waist widths ranging from 83 down to 75 mm, replaces the long-successful Nomad series (Crimson, Black Eye, and Smoke) in Atomic's line, but is similarly targeted at all-mountain skiers who spend the majority of their time carving on groomed snow. The Vantage X line borrows from the light-yet-powerful design philosophy of the wider Vantage models. Like the Vantages, all Vantage X's are built on full wood cores. The top three X's are similarly reinforced with Atomic's Ti Backbone, a sheet of metal that extends wall-to-wall underfoot, where its needed for edge grip and power, but tapers toward tip and tail, to keep things light and manageable. All models are reinforced with a layer of Atomic's Carbon Tank Mesh, a grid of carbon fibers that adds strength while reducing weight. And as with the wider Vantages, extra-thick Firewall sidewalls add mass over the edge, dampening vibrations and transmitting more skier energy for smooth powerful edge grip and tracking. Unlike the Vantages, which are sold flat, the Vantage X's are sold only as systems, with bindings ranging from a beefy, high-performance 13-DIN down to an economical 10-DIN. The flat tails (non-twin, non-rockered) of the Vantage X series give them a more locked-in feel and more powerful turn finishes than the smearier, slight-twin Vantages. And the Vantage X models feature Atomic's new Exo Profile, in which the top corers of the ski are beveled inward fore and aft to reduce swing weight. Atomic, founded in 1955, is based in Altenmarkt im Pongau, Austria (near Salzburg), where the majority of its skis are made. Along with sister brands Salomon and ArcTeryx, it is a division of Amer Sports of Finland, which acquired it in 1994. Its U.S. headquarters are in Ogden, Utah. -J.C.

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