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Health and Nutrition

Ski every day—and take the stairs at the office

Hey, desk potatoes: Little lifestyle changes can add up.

As far as fitness goes, it seems that a little can go a long way. No one is disputing the benefits of nailing nonstop runs on the Hobacks (kind of like running a marathon on snow). But recent data indicates that a little action in the day-to-day grind can lower your risk of heart disease and diabetes. Easy lifestyle changes can do a lot of heavy lifting: Take the stairs. Park in the outer stretches of the lot. Push away from your keyboard and take a walk outside your office for a quick break a few times a day.

Will there be a test for altitude sickness?

Ski news altitude sickness
Will there be a test for altitude sickness?
Research: Your genes might make you feel low when heading high.

Ever get a raging case of altitude sickness? Even a minor dose can ruin a ski vacation with headaches, nausea and generally feeling lousy all over. It’s no fun. Severe cases, of course, can be life threatening. Figure you need to be in better shape to keep altitude sickness out of your ski life? That might not be the case. The latest research being done at the U of Colorado might point to a genetic link to the mountain malady. If that holds up, can an altitude sickness test be far behind?

Josh Dueck's Incredible Sit-Ski Backflip

Josh Dueck
Josh Dueck
Paraplegic skier Josh Dueck amazes and inspires by landing the first-ever sit-ski backflip.

Freeskier Josh Dueck was only 23 years old when he overshot a front flip off a jump at Silver Star, B.C., his home mountain, in 2004. He came to in the hospital to find that he was paralyzed from the waist down, never to ski—traditionally, at least—again. But that wouldn't stop him. Not even close. Nine months later Dueck was back on the slopes in a sit-ski, which he called his freedom chair.

The (New Mexican) Chile Special

The (New Mexican) Chile Special
green chile
Or why skiing and spicy food have the same effect on your brain.

Since early season snow took the “Turquoise Trail” into New Mexico, those headed in and around the Land of Enchantment this winter should know what else to look for aside from the white stuff: the red and green. Ski areas like Taos might give this state recognition, but its spicy chile peppers are what makes it famous. Let’s take a peek at what makes chiles and their brightly colored sauces so addictive, and the ski town spots to find the tastiest dishes.

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