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Instruction

A New Way to Learn How to Ski?

Learn to ski at Jiminy Peak
Terrain Based Instruction
Terrain-based instruction recruits the slope itself as a teacher.

There never has been a truly easy way to learn how to ski—there just are too many moving parts, both gear and human. And that’s part of the sweet satisfaction of becoming an expert rider: It takes a bunch of time and hard work. But there’s an innovative new terrain-focused instruction method catching on at resorts nationwide that strives to shorten the skiing learning curve.

Secrets From a Ski Team Tech

Secrets From a Ski Team Tech
Ski Tech-main
Fischer's ski tuning guru Leo Mussi dishes on the secrets of fast skis.

Leo Mussi knows ski tech. The 45-year-old is Fischer Sports’ go-to tuner for its alpine ski team. Based in San Candido, Italy, he took some time leading up to the Olympics to chat about what makes skis fast.

Pro skiers get all the fame, but it's often the techs that can make or break a race for the pros. What goes into making sure skis are always ready?

Snowbird: Mountain School

Snowbird Mountain School
snowbird mountain school image sponsored
From steeps to family-friendly areas, the Snowbird Mountain School has a lot to offer everyone.

Offering 3,240 vertical feet of award-winning terrain enjoyed by all skill levels of skiers and Utah’s longest ski season, Snowbird is an accessible family vacation destination.

Powder Day: What's a "Smear?"

Fat, rockered skis have changed the way we ski powder. Get with the program.

The term “smear” only recently entered the skiing vocabulary, with the advent of super-fat, rockered skis. Smearing is the fundamental technique for new-school powder skiing, but it’s not one everyone understands. It helps to think of the difference between skidding and carving on flat snow.

What I Learned: Woodward at Copper

Good news for trying to keep up (survive?) with your kids on the slopes. Yeah, you really can teach an old dog new tricks.

“I’m not so sure about this.” That’s the thought playing in my head as I step up to the thick blue mats inside Woodward at Copper’s vaulted space, known as the Barn. Am I nervous about flying down a 41-degree slope of synthetic snow into a seven-foot-deep pit filled with blue foam blocks? Well, yes. Am I nervous about sliding down said slope in front of a dozen 10- to 16-year-old park rats? Totally. 

What I Learned: Women's Freeride Ski Camp

Self-doubt can be paralyzing—or it can be empowering.

In my experience, chutes always look their steepest, narrowest, and scariest from above. So I’m caught off guard by the paralyzing fear that grips me when I’m standing nearly a quarter-mile away from La Parva’s La Chiminea. The tributary cut from the Andean rock walls looks ominous. Catch an edge in there and you’re toast. Are those tears pooling in the foam liner of my goggles? What is wrong with me?

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