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Whistler Blackcomb

Sixteen huge, snow-fattened bowls scallop across majestic twin peaks. Punctuated with glaciers, the expanse feels like the Alps—with consistently great service (No. 5), seamless connectivity (Lifts, No. 2, including the bold Peak 2 Peak gondola), and a lifetime of choose-your-adventure skiing (Terrain Variety, No. 1; Challenge, No. 7). Whistler Blackcomb is back at the top of the rankings (it was No. 1 in 2012–13), and readers are giddy. “Nothing else in North America compares.” “The mountain is an 11- plus... Just more in every way.” The slopes descend a whopping vertical mile through lush spruce forests (and frequent dreaded mid-mountain fog) to a dynamic ski-tropolis as abundant and diverse as the mountains above. —Susan Reifer Ryan

What’s New » Keep an eye out for new dining options, including Alta Bistro, Fuji Market, Harajuku Izakaya, David’s Tea, Chinese Bistro and the reborn Uli’s Flipside.

On-Hill Lunch » Christine’s at Blackcomb’s Rendezvous, where regionally sourced entrées paired with award-winning Okanagan wines cost only a few dollars more than lunch in the cafeterias.

Family Activity » Riding the Peak 2 Peak for an unforgettable “Wow.”

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[ Mon, 2011-01-03 14:00 ]
Ever pictured what skiing would be like inside a snowglobe? This video provides a unique perspective on the massive two-resort ski mecca.

Ever pictured a ski resort from the inside of a snowglobe? The artful skiers at Switchback Entertainment have. This style of cinematography - which makes people, places and things appear like tiny miniature models - was inspired by stop motion & tilt shift photography techniques.

Olympic Bounce?

Olympic Bounce?
Olympics: What Now?
With the $6 billion Vancouver Winter Games Over, What’s the long-term payoff? The biggest benefit might not be easy to count.

Hosting an Olympics is like playing roulette, as far as immediate financial impacts are concerned. Go ahead, spin the wheel: Winter 2002: Salt Lake makes a $100 million profit; Summer 2004: Athens spends $15 billion, and 21 out of their 24 venues are now in disrepair; 1992: Albertville loses $57 million; The next Winter Olympics, only two years later, Lillehammer rakes in $50 million.

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