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Squaw Valley

Every time I ski Squaw, I bump into the same people on the KT Express chair. I never have to wait long to find diehard ski buddies who begin, spend and end each winter day lapping this one lift and its expert terrain. But a good day at Squaw for CEO emeritus Nancy Wendt Cushing—who just passed the reins of this brawny and historic mountain to someone outside the Cushing clan—involves covering a lot more ground on skis. It’s an easy thing to do: While this California classic may be best known for its signature steeps, Squaw’s six summits offer abundant options for literally all levels of skiers.

“Follow the sun,” Cushing advises with a knowing smile. She likes to start by zooming up the Funitel (a key component in a lift network capable of moving more bodies uphill per hour than any other ski area in the U.S.), then warming up on the easy, open meadow at the summit. From there she heads to the broad, rolling boulevards of forested Shirley Lake—a sunny day favorite with intermediates and families.

Back at the top, breeze down the sinuous folds of Silverado, a favorite hidden stash for Squaw skiers in the know. Each run gets more challenging. Next, angle down Headwall’s steeps then swing through the bumps of Sun Bowl. Nancy does it all wearing a ball cap, sunglasses and a happy look. With Squaw’s new efforts to improve the on- and off-hill customer experience, you and your family will have the same happy grin—even if you don’t meet your buddies at the KT chair. —S.R.

What’s New: Finally: Olympic House gets a renovation; new family features include a kids’ fun zone and trail map, and upgrades at the Children’s Center; new lighting will keep the terrain park open at night.

Mandatory Run: Did we mention KT Express? Easy way down: The Saddle.

Don’t Miss: High Camp, and its grab bag of non-ski diversions with lake views.

Village at Squaw Valley USA

Village at Squaw Valley USA
Village at Squaw Valley USA
The village at Squaw Valley has restaurants, shops, a spa, and a variety of suite-style accommodations.

This slope side, suite-style hotel has accommodations that range from single hotel rooms to three-bedroom condos. The Village has shops, restaurants, and a range of events and activities in both the summer and the winter. Stop into the Trilogy spa after a day on the slopes, and hit the Lava Lounge for a glass of wine and mini-treatments before heading back to your room. The resort also offers ski and stay packages each winter.
Squaw Valley, California | 866.818.6963 | thevillageatsquaw.com

Olympic Museum

Olympic Museum
Squaw Olympic Museum
Learn about the 1960 Winter Olympics, the first televised games, which took place at Squaw Valley.

Learn about the 1960 Winter Olympics, the first televised games, which took place at Squaw Valley. The highlight from the games that year includes the “Team of Destiny” men’s hockey team that defeated both the USSR and Czechoslovakia teams during close matches to win the gold. Located at High Camp at the top of the Cable Car, see a collection of memorabilia, news articles, and video presentations of the event.

Squaw Valley, CA | 530.583.6985 | squaw.com

Olympic Ice Pavilion Ice Skating

Olympic Ice Pavilion Ice Skating
Squaw Valley Ice Skating
Accessed via Squaw Valley’s Cable Car, enjoy panoramic views of Lake Tahoe and surrounding areas while skating on an Olympic-sized rink.

Accessed via Squaw Valley’s Cable Car, enjoy panoramic views of Lake Tahoe and surrounding areas while skating on an Olympic-sized rink located at the crest of the mountain. Ice skating is available for all ages and is open for both summer and winter seasons. Want to learn to skate better? Private lessons are available by appointment.

Squaw Valley, CA | 530.583.6985 | squaw.com

Squaw Valley Dog Sledding

Squaw Valley Dog Sledding
Squaw Dogsledding
Experience an hour-long, daytime or sunset dog sledding tour in the Squaw Valley Meadow.

Experience an hour-long, daytime or sunset dog sledding tour in the Squaw Valley Meadow. Each group will be accompanied by a racing guide and a team of up to 10 Alaskan Huskies on a route that is almost three miles. Every sled travels at almost 14 miles per hour and holds four people. The cost is $45 for children under 60 pounds, and $95 adults and children more than 60 pounds.

Squaw Valley, CA | 530.583.6300 | tahoedogsledtours.com

Squaw Valley Kid’s Zip-line

Squaw Valley Kid’s Zip-line
Squaw Valley Kid’s Zip-line1
Located at the mountain’s base, the kid’s zip-line is about 200-feet long.

Located at the mountain’s base, the kid’s zip-line is about 200-feet long. The scenic route overlooks the granite peak of Red Dog, the perfect adventure for children. For each ride, the participants will slide on a harness and then climb to the top of the launch tower for their leap. Best suited for kids less than 120 pounds. One ride is $12 and each additional ride is $6.

Squaw Valley, CA | 530.583.6985 | squaw.com

Squaw Valley Paintball

Squaw Valley Paintball
Squaw Valley Paintball
Opened in summer 2010, paintball at Squaw Valley offers participants the chance for friendly competition on two different courses.

Opened in summer 2010, paintball at Squaw Valley offers participants the chance for friendly competition on the natural-terrain “Woodsball” course or the “Speedball” course, which is made of artificial obstacles. Open noon to 5 p.m. each day, prices are $45 for adults and $40 for kids without purchase of a cable car ticket, or $29 for adults and $24 for kids with the purchase of a cable car ticket. Each round is approximately one hour and 150 rounds of paint.

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