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Hard Snow Grip

Hard Snow Grip

Displaying 11 - 20 of 33

October 7, 2010
A relatively narrow ski suited to cruising groomers and shredding bumps, the Waveflex 14 is a mellow, predictable carver that pleased testers of all sizes with its laid-back feel. It initiated and gripped best when testers relaxed and pressured the ski’s belly and tails through medium-radius turns; it was less responsive to weight-forward aggressiveness. All testers praised its edge grip and stability. [$1,150 with binding]
October 7, 2010
Think of this as Everyman’s race ski. It does everything you expect a narrow carver to do—slice into the turn, grip powerfully, quickly pop into the next turn—but is more forgiving than a thoroughbred racer. Testers were uniformly impressed with its easy initiation, turn-shape variability, maneuverability, and steadiness at all speeds. It coaxes advanced intermediates into clean carves, but aggressive experts will find no limit to its power. [$940 without binding]
October 6, 2010
Like all Völkl test models, the Tierra has a feeling of structural cohesiveness: All components work harmoniously. Purpose-built for female physiology, it features a raised toepiece to create a neutral stance, which is said to even the energy draw throughout the leg and reduce knee strain. Its tip is stiffer than its tail, and the tail is narrower than those of Völkl’s comparable unisex models. The result is quick, reliable turn initiation followed by a smooth, easy exit. It’s a zippy carver whose in-turn behavior is characterized by unfailing stability and grip.
October 6, 2010
“Totally effortless,” said one tester. “Holds an edge but isn’t edgy,” said another. The Koa 78 isn’t designed for intermediates, but intermediates will find it a friendly, encouraging companion as they master carving technique and begin exploring off-trail. Experts loved it, too, and found it a fast, powerful carver capable in any medium short of deep powder. A perfect blend of sidecut and camber let the ski lock into carves but disengage and skid when needed without chattering.
October 6, 2010
The D2’s two-tiered construction damps vibration and reduces a ski’s tendency to twist while on edge. The result is a smooth, quiet ride and magnetic edge grip. Despite its tenacious bite, our women testers found it adaptable and easy to skid and slide. But stay forward, they warned; its stiff tail tends to punish the rider who falls into the backseat. It’s a perfect daily driver for East Coasters, but it’ll handle groomed snow anywhere with aplomb. Zero chatter.
October 6, 2010
This carvy, responsive groomed-snow warrior may have saved tester Megan Michelson from bodily harm. Nearly blindsided by a spacey day-tripper, Megan made a lightning-quick adjustment and reported that the ski “reacted on a dime.” With traditional camber, no rocker, and sidecut that begins at the fat tip, the responsive Attraxion 8 hooks instantly into turns and grips securely throughout. Experts found it well matched to their power; intermediates may want to check out the Attraxion 3 or 1.
October 6, 2010
This ultralight all-carbon carver is a great all-mountain choice for women who don’t want to work too hard pushing a heavier wood-core ski around. Best suited to well-manicured groomers—think sunny mornings on blue cruisers—it doesn’t have the width for more than a few inches of powder, and crud can send this featherweight stick bouncing. It dives eagerly into arcs and pulls confidently across the hill. Highly maneuverable, it prefers medium speeds. Skis this light can take some getting used to, but you’ll be surprised at the energy you’ll save.
October 6, 2010
Responsive and eager to set an edge, this quick little number rips slalom turns with security and grace and doesn’t chatter at speed. But it’s forgiving, too—great for mellow weekend resort skiers who occasionally duck into the trees. Lightweight testers found it easy to turn without much muscle. Its stability and tracking enabled testers to work on two-footed carving technique. One tester called them “the Scarlett Johansson of skis: lush, curvy, and easy to look at.”
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