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Overall

Overall

Displaying 1 - 10 of 32

October 20, 2011
October 8, 2010
Our female testers liked this one as much as the guys liked their S86. Like the S86, it employs the AmpTek rockered-tips/camber-underfoot concept. It carved zesty medium-radius turns on firm snow, but the rocker allowed for easy disengagement from carves and smeary maneuverability off the corduroy. Sidecut begins farther back from the tip than it does on a groomer-specific ski, allowing the S86W to be steered easily without being hooky. This design worked well in bumps and crud. A true all-mountain freeride ski.
October 8, 2010
Featuring the Mantra’s proven laminate build and vertical sidewalls, the Kenja is built for technically strong women who ski on- and off-trail in equal measure—East or West. “For girls who like fine wines,” said one tester. “This ski has taste and class.” It’s a carving heroine that arcs stable medium-radius turns on groomed snow, yet its width can handle various snow types. Lighter testers found it a bit unwieldy off-trail but loved its groomer performance. Powerful women loved it everywhere.
October 7, 2010
“An all-mountain generalist,” declared one Tahoe-based racer turned free-skier. “I couldn’t find snow it didn’t like.” The fast, stable Eden seemed to prefer strong skiers with technical backgrounds; ex-racers loved its big-turn power while laid-back freeskiers found it a mite obstreperous and unwilling to skid. The wide shovel hooks easily into turns, and the ski is equally comfortable in long and short arcs. A tiny dose of tip rocker is just enough to deflect crud well and enhance agility in tight spots.
October 7, 2010
On groomers the Tornado screams through medium- and large-radius turns with power and precision, gripping securely but disengaging when necessary. In crud, bumps, and trees it’s energetic and maneuverable. It’s perfect for folks looking for a playful ski that knows how to work hard when the time comes—patrollers, instructors, and all-mountain generalists. Overall, it’s a great blend of on- and off-piste strengths. [$1,190 with binding]
October 7, 2010
Another winner in K2’s stellar A.M.P. line, the Rictor stands out among all-mountain skis by virtue of its playfulness, manageable power, and confidence-inspiring edge grip. Like most all-mountain skis, the Rictor eschews tight turns for looser, longer ones and handles groomers, crud, and mild doses of powder. A slightly rockered tip dives effortlessly into carves and steers nimbly through bumps and trees. Experts and intermediates, mellow and aggro, East and West—all will dig the Rictor. [$1,125 with binding]
October 7, 2010
An easygoing frontside ski, the Fire Arrow uses traditional camber and an hourglass shape to carve medium- and large-radius turns, though it will bend into short zingers with a bit of effort. Playfulness and ease define it, thanks in part to the kicked-up tail, which lends it a surfy maneuverability. If you’re looking for a fun, versatile, groomer-oriented ski with some park and crud capability, it’s a good choice. [$1,399 with binding]