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Overall

Overall

Displaying 11 - 20 of 32

October 7, 2010
A narrowish mid-fat carver, the 78 handles crud and the occasional off-trail foray well. But it prefers carving medium- to large-radius turns on groomed snow. It’s an easy ski—intermediates will enjoy not having to pour in power to get a comfortable, cruisey ride. It tends to initiate turns slowly and locks into arcs when pressure’s applied to the belly and tail. Aggressive skiers wanted more pop, but cruisers liked its undemanding feel. [$1,000 with binding]
October 7, 2010
Perfect for the on-piste advancing intermediate or expert looking for an exciting ride, the Mag 7.6 playfully carves a variety of turn shapes. “Buy this if you’re an East Coaster who crushes morning groomers,” said a New York–based tester with a background in retail and racing. Though it thrives on the feet of weight-forward athletic skiers, it won’t punish momentary technical lapses. A quick, easy entry and explosive exit define the turn. [$899 with binding]
October 7, 2010
“So versatile,” said a 200-pound male tester. “A joy to ski.” K2 bills the Charger as a multipurpose, high-performance hard-snow ski, and all testers—from intermediates to experts—agreed. It has the sturdy feel and secure grip you’d expect from a wood-core ski and it slices clean, round, medium- to large-radius arcs. Slight tip rocker enhances maneuverability and eases turn initiation. Easy to disengage and skid when necessary. [$1,250 with binding]
October 6, 2010
This easy turner is the perfect companion for relaxed, sunny-day cruising. Its deep sidecut facilitates quick, spunky turns, but the ski isn’t difficult to control. It initiates smoothly and holds a secure edge on groomed snow. Testers found it responsive whether they skied aggressively or throttled down. It’s a well-balanced ski, and it works best if you’re centered and balanced too. The Great One weaves deftly through trees and bumps, and its stiff shovel punches through crud.
October 6, 2010
“These made me feel like a better skier,” said one tester. Perfect for resort skiers East or West, the Free Luv is fun and lively on- or off-piste. It carves with smooth energy, bouncing from one turn to the next on corduroy and steep chalk. Mild tip rocker enhances maneuverability and eases initiation. It’s quick and nimble in bumps and trees and tackles crud without shaking. Easy to disengage and skid, the Lotta Luv earned a high versatility rating. A real game-improvement tool.
October 6, 2010
The pronounced rocker of a powder ski can be a detriment on groomed snow, causing tips to flap and making turn initiation difficult. But like K2’s other groomer and all-mountain skis, the Burnin Luv has a subtle rocker that puts the ski’s forebody into a “pre-flexed” shape, so initiation takes less effort than it would with either pronounced rocker or none at all. The Burnin Luv carves groomers with ease and quickness, and it slays bumps and firm tree lines. It’s an accessible frontside tool for East or West.
October 6, 2010
The Diamond put our women in a companionable mood—they called it “approachable,” “adaptive,” “friendly,” and “unintimidating.” Though it sports a relatively narrow waist and traditional camber, it smeared surprisingly well and seemed happiest dabbling in trees and bumps. It’s comfortable running slowly or with haste, and it’s easy to initiate. Hardpack performance is smooth and fluid. Medium turns are its preferred mode.
July 7, 2010
Here's a sneak peak at a 2010-2011 women's ski from Black Diamond called the Starlet. We had a chance to test this women's early-rise, lightweight powder ski during an early morning backcountry tour in Utah's Little Cottonwood Canyon.
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