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PRINT DIGITAL

Quickness

Quickness

Displaying 11 - 20 of 30

October 7, 2010
“So versatile,” said a 200-pound male tester. “A joy to ski.” K2 bills the Charger as a multipurpose, high-performance hard-snow ski, and all testers—from intermediates to experts—agreed. It has the sturdy feel and secure grip you’d expect from a wood-core ski and it slices clean, round, medium- to large-radius arcs. Slight tip rocker enhances maneuverability and eases turn initiation. Easy to disengage and skid when necessary. [$1,250 with binding]
October 7, 2010
A relatively narrow ski suited to cruising groomers and shredding bumps, the Waveflex 14 is a mellow, predictable carver that pleased testers of all sizes with its laid-back feel. It initiated and gripped best when testers relaxed and pressured the ski’s belly and tails through medium-radius turns; it was less responsive to weight-forward aggressiveness. All testers praised its edge grip and stability. [$1,150 with binding]
October 7, 2010
Think of this as Everyman’s race ski. It does everything you expect a narrow carver to do—slice into the turn, grip powerfully, quickly pop into the next turn—but is more forgiving than a thoroughbred racer. Testers were uniformly impressed with its easy initiation, turn-shape variability, maneuverability, and steadiness at all speeds. It coaxes advanced intermediates into clean carves, but aggressive experts will find no limit to its power. [$940 without binding]
October 6, 2010
Like all Völkl test models, the Tierra has a feeling of structural cohesiveness: All components work harmoniously. Purpose-built for female physiology, it features a raised toepiece to create a neutral stance, which is said to even the energy draw throughout the leg and reduce knee strain. Its tip is stiffer than its tail, and the tail is narrower than those of Völkl’s comparable unisex models. The result is quick, reliable turn initiation followed by a smooth, easy exit. It’s a zippy carver whose in-turn behavior is characterized by unfailing stability and grip.
October 6, 2010
Whether you love tight, short-radius turns or GS sweepers, this high-energy ski will satisfy your craving for edge-to-edge action. “Definitely fun to carve ‘easy-style,’” said one tester. Other testers noted that Blizzard’s lively Viva is forgiving and lightweight, springs friskily into action on the corduroy, and digs in tenaciously on the steeps. Ex-racers and freeskiers alike agreed that this ski has plenty to offer experts, but remains an easygoing, friendly ride for upwardly mobile intermediates. **Editors Note: The price for these skis was printed incorrectly in the print edition of Skiing's 2011 Gear Guide. The correct price for these skis, with bindings, is $849.99.**
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