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Resort Mixed-Piste

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Resort Mixed-Piste

Displaying 11 - 20 of 53

October 8, 2010
Featuring the Mantra’s proven laminate build and vertical sidewalls, the Kenja is built for technically strong women who ski on- and off-trail in equal measure—East or West. “For girls who like fine wines,” said one tester. “This ski has taste and class.” It’s a carving heroine that arcs stable medium-radius turns on groomed snow, yet its width can handle various snow types. Lighter testers found it a bit unwieldy off-trail but loved its groomer performance. Powerful women loved it everywhere.
October 7, 2010
“An all-mountain generalist,” declared one Tahoe-based racer turned free-skier. “I couldn’t find snow it didn’t like.” The fast, stable Eden seemed to prefer strong skiers with technical backgrounds; ex-racers loved its big-turn power while laid-back freeskiers found it a mite obstreperous and unwilling to skid. The wide shovel hooks easily into turns, and the ski is equally comfortable in long and short arcs. A tiny dose of tip rocker is just enough to deflect crud well and enhance agility in tight spots.
October 7, 2010
With shorter lengths intended for women, the LX82 is an encouraging friend for an intermediate woman looking to up her game. “It encourages commitment to the fall line,” one tester said, “but it forgave minor balance infractions.” It’s a mellower ski than Kästle’s sidewall-construction carvers, but it still requires attention. Trust the edge, tip the ski, and feel yourself improve.
October 7, 2010
Most models in Nordica’s unisex and women’s carving series—not just those at the upper end—favor aggressive skiers with strong technical backgrounds…or lesser skiers who are willing to commit to improvement. The Conquer is no exception. Stay alert: It will start arcing the moment you step off the lift. It crushes junky snow the way a cambered ski should by displacing it rather than planing over it. Among women’s groomer-centric all-mountain skis, its responsiveness is unparalleled.
October 6, 2010
This easy turner is the perfect companion for relaxed, sunny-day cruising. Its deep sidecut facilitates quick, spunky turns, but the ski isn’t difficult to control. It initiates smoothly and holds a secure edge on groomed snow. Testers found it responsive whether they skied aggressively or throttled down. It’s a well-balanced ski, and it works best if you’re centered and balanced too. The Great One weaves deftly through trees and bumps, and its stiff shovel punches through crud.
October 6, 2010
The pronounced rocker of a powder ski can be a detriment on groomed snow, causing tips to flap and making turn initiation difficult. But like K2’s other groomer and all-mountain skis, the Burnin Luv has a subtle rocker that puts the ski’s forebody into a “pre-flexed” shape, so initiation takes less effort than it would with either pronounced rocker or none at all. The Burnin Luv carves groomers with ease and quickness, and it slays bumps and firm tree lines. It’s an accessible frontside tool for East or West.
October 6, 2010
This ultralight all-carbon carver is a great all-mountain choice for women who don’t want to work too hard pushing a heavier wood-core ski around. Best suited to well-manicured groomers—think sunny mornings on blue cruisers—it doesn’t have the width for more than a few inches of powder, and crud can send this featherweight stick bouncing. It dives eagerly into arcs and pulls confidently across the hill. Highly maneuverable, it prefers medium speeds. Skis this light can take some getting used to, but you’ll be surprised at the energy you’ll save.