Close

Member Login

Logging In
Invalid username or password.
Incorrect Login. Please try again.

not a member? sign-up now!

Signing up could earn you gear and it helps to keep offensive content off of our site.

PRINT DIGITAL

How to Take the Perfect Pow Shot

With Adam Clark.
posted: 06/16/2008

Gear up for the season by getting equipped to capture a frameworthy picture.

THROW DOWN
If you're committed, shell out for a digital camera with a single lens reflex (SLR). The SLR Canon Rebel ($900) with a 70-200mm lens is a perfect place to start.

DO YOUR RECON
Before a storm hits, find steeps that skiers can hit with speed. Look for shots with an uncluttered background, like the sky or dark cliff bands. Don't shoot against snow: You'll lose all definition.

NO SLACKING
Be ready to roll as soon as the sun comes out. Mornings generally have the best light. Bring radios to talk with your skiers as well as lens wipes to soak moisture off your glass.

OUTSMART YOUR CAMERA
A digital camera thinks it's capturing more light than it actually is because of light reflecting off the snow. This means pictures will look dark. Compensate by overexposing the shot by two stops. Open the camera's aperture and keep a fast shutter speed, at least 1/1000, to freeze motion.

STAKE YOURSELF OUT
Stand where you can capture as much of the exploding snow as possible (in front or to the side). You're shooting the snow flying around the skier rather than the actual skier.

SHOOT, SHOOT, SHOOT
Squeeze the shutter before, during, and after the skier passes through the shot. The more pictures you take, the more likely you'll have a decent shot.  (Quick Tip: Keep two or three skiers on deck at a shoot.  It'll speed things up and increase your odds of getting the perfect shot.)

DON'T EDIT
Taking pictures in raw format eats up memory. Bring plenty of cards – as many as you can afford – and resist the urge to edit your shots on the camera. Viewing them on a large monitor will help reveal details that you may miss on a small screen.

Tips provided by Adam Clark. He uses a Canon ID Mark II digital SLR when he's off shooting for Skiing, Bike, and Backpacker. He travels on assignment about four months of the year.

Learn More: Missoula, Montana's Rocky Mountain School of Photography (rmsp.com; 800-394-7677) offers a three-month intensive course for aspiring photographers as well as weekend workshops for digital enthusiasts around the country.

--------------------------------------------

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
  • No HTML tags allowed

More information about formatting options

Type the characters you see in this picture. (verify using audio)
Type the characters you see in the picture above; if you can't read them, submit the form and a new image will be generated. Not case sensitive.
All submitted comments are subject to the license terms set forth in our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use
Google+