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Getting Deep With Keely Kelleher

Keely Kelleher is one of our newest athletes and just wrapped up a shoot with our film crew in Utah. This 27 year-old is juggling not only a new career in filming and freeskiing, but running an expanding ski race and freeski camp series, getting a degree in business - and studying physical therapy. We caught up with her to find out a little about what brought her to WME what inspires her to do what she does. By Brigid Mander | Photography by Marcus Caston

Keely Kelleher, one of Warren Miller Enterainment’s newest additions, is a rather busy girl. Kelleher is a former US Ski Team racer in DH and Super G with a penchant for “going fast and hitting big jumps.” Right now, however, the 27 year-old is juggling not only a new career in filming and freeskiing with WME, but running an expanding ski race and freeski camp series, getting a degree in business - and studying physical therapy. We caught up with her to find out a little about what brought her to WME what inspires her to do what she does.

This is my first time filming with WME. I am getting to check off my 'things to do in my life' list that I started when I was a little girl. In broken 4th grader handwriting, #5: Be in a Warren Miller Movie!!!!!

The crew's experience and knowledge is unreal. Everyday someone says something that puts us all on the floor or snow laughing till it hurts. Growing up watching Warren Miller movies I always remember how much fun the athletes made skiing look. I know we are accomplishing the 'fun factor.'

 Warren Miller movies have inspired me for years. At night after we shoot I go home and watch old clips. It's kind of like doing your ski homework. The crew shares these great stories from different places they have filmed. I like to channel that into my turns.  

The best thing about having a racing background is being able to ski anything you want and ski it technically sound. Good technique keeps you safe when you are skiing hard terrain. I want to continue to push myself in freeskiing and see what is possible.

In 2003 I broke my tibia and fibula downhill training at Beaver Creek. It took 7 surgeries and 3 years to get back to the World Cup. There were a lot of times I wanted to give up; but as a stubborn Montana girl I fought through it. I'd be on the therapy table visualizing downhill courses. The key ingredient in my long recovery is that I love to ski.

After my injury I had to reevaluate some of my goals. I had to work so hard to even get back to the World Cup. I of course had already missed the 2006 Olympics and so many World Cup races in the three years of being sidelined. I remember feeling so elated and accomplished scoring my first World Cup points in 2008.

I wasn't mentally ready to be done with ski racing. My leg couldn't take the jarring ice at 80 mph anymore. The first season away from ski racing just so happened to be one of the biggest snow years in Utah. All I did was ski powder, and for the first time in along time I wasn't in pain.

When I was eight years old I remember watching Diane Roffe and Picabo Street win Olympic medals. Professional women athletes are given an opportunity to reflect a positive and healthy image to young girls in sports.

In 2011 I couldn’t think of a better way to accomplish this then by starting the first ever ski racing camp for girls. This camp provides the unique opportunity to be coached by not only the best females in the sport of skiing, but the best role models.

Of all the things I've done in my skiing career nothing has been more rewarding than teaching young girls in skiing how to shred. I recognize that skiing has given me incredible opportunities and shaped who I am today. The staff and myself are dedicated to sharing our wisdom, knowledge and experience with the next generation of female skiers.