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Chris Anthony Interview: A Tribute to the 10th Mountain Division

Chris Anthony is a long-standing professional skier and adventurer, who shreds around the world and has been in over 20 Warren Miller films. This past winter, he shot a Warren Miller Entertainment segment in Colorado that paid tribute to the iconic 10th Mountain Division, made famous by their unique mountain-based contribution during World War II.

Chris Anthony is a long-standing professional skier and adventurer, who shreds around the world and has been in over 20 Warren Miller films. This past winter, he shot a Warren Miller Entertainment segment in Colorado that paid tribute to the iconic 10th Mountain Division, made famous by their unique mountain-based contribution during World War II.

The historical importance of the 10th Mountain soldiers and their subsequent contribution to skiing in the US was something that had intrigued Anthony for years. In this segment, he got the chance to really explore and appreciate the hard work and innovation of the 10th Mountain, and the ski knowledge they brought back with them after being stationed in Italy during the war.

We caught up with Anthony to chat about his latest segment and what it is like to have been filming with Warren Miller for over two decades.

How did you feel about doing a segment on the famed 10th Mountain Division?

This subject matter has been something I have personally wanted to approach for years. A number of the 10th Mountain Division Vets are also the fathers of the modern ski industry in North America. I felt a tribute to them by the greatest ski documentary film company was a perfect fit. Plus, it did give me an excuse to dig deeper into our history and learn a little more about our Greatest Generation.

Where was the segment filmed?

We shot the majority of the segment in and around Camp Hale, in Pando, Colorado, where the camp was established in 1942 [between Red Cliff and Leadville, CO, in the Eagle River Valley]. The army chose this location due to the proximity to the railroad, the mountains, and the secure location.

Why did WME entertainment agree to this topic for the film?

I think WME, through Max Bervy, Josh Haskins and Chris Patterson, also saw the importance of this story. The segment was done out of pure passion. The crew rented an RV and lived on site for a week. They were totally into it.

Who else was involved?  

The other skiers included Scott Kennett, who was featured in the Warren Miller films in the 80's and 90's. His link to the story is he had a favorite uncle that served in the 10th. Tony Seibert is also featured in the segment. He is the grandson of Pete Seibert, who was a vet of the 10th and the founder of Vail.

Are there any other favorite or memorable segments you have filmed for WME?

That’s a tough question, because each one of them has been so unique. But the audience seems to approach me on the street and remember a few, such as: The Marines " How cold was that water?" and China, "That looked just crazy.  What were those people and those skis like?" and Leadville, " Are you ok?"  There is also Alaska, "That event is nuts!" and the USS NIMITZ, "Did you get to fly in one of those Jets?" and of course, Sleeper House, "Is that really your house and your girlfriend?"

More than two decades of Warren Miller is quite impressive. What has that been like?

I have been blessed enough to be part of 23 years of the Warren Miller Franchise, an honor I don't take likely. I have been willing to do what ever it takes to help get a segment done.  

The amazing thing about skiing is that I'm actually better in the big mountains than I have ever been. I have stayed healthy: staying physically in shape for this sport is part of a daily, 3-hour training regimen I have been loyal to for as long as I can remember.

With the new equipment it is easier to conquer terrain. For example, when I skied the 10th Mountain gear, that was impossible. It made me think how skilled those guys were back than compared to us now.  

How did your relationship with the company begin?

The Warren Miller film crew found me when I was in an all mountain competition; the event was to find the best skier on the mountain. I was chasing after one of my idols Mike Farney, who was already featured in the film. He suggested that they take me to France to film. It was an eye opening experience. It was like learning a new sport. I loved it. I have done what ever I can to stay involved.